Security and Cryptography

In the past ten years, the Internet has evolved tremendously in terms of both the type of services and applications being deployed and the kind of malicious activity being carried out. Web applications have become tremendously popular, and, nowadays, they are routinely used in security-critical environments, such as medical, financial, and military systems. As the use of web applications for critical services has increased, the number and sophistication of attacks against these applications have grown as well. In addition, the hosts that are compromised often become part of large-scale botnets and are used to spread malware (e.g., through drive-by downloads) or to host scam and phishing sites.

The Computer Security faculty in the Department of Computer Science at UCSB focus their research on addressing the real-world, high-impact security problems of today's and tomorrow's Internet. By combining different techniques from machine learning to formal verification, from program analysis to hardware simulation, these novel approaches can identify and counteract security threats, and contribute to making the Internet a safer place.

Affilated Labs: 
Computer Security Lab, SAND Lab, Verification Lab , ArchLab

Faculty

Prof. Bultan's research focuses on automated verification techniques and their application to software.

Dr. Chong’s research redefines computer architectures and systems in the context of new technologies and application domains.  His current research focuses on emerging technologies for computing, multicore and embedded architectures, computer security, and sustainable computing.

Professor Kemmerer's research interests include formal specification and verification of computer systems, system and network security and reliability, programming and specification language design, and software engineering. 

The main focus of my research is systems security. I seek to create solutions that solve important security issues affecting a large number of users. The goal of my work is to build security systems, deploy them in real-world environments, and perform experiments to characterize and explain their behavior.

My research interests lie in cryptography and its interplay with other areas in computer science, including theory of computing, algorithm design, and security.

The end of classical transistor scaling laws (i.e. Dennard Scaling) means that radical new approaches to computing systems are desperately needed.  Professor Sherwood and his lab have been developing systems for this new era which use application-customization to achieve efficiency, exploit new devices and materials for new computational abilities, and attempt to provide functionality beyond performance such as provable security properties. 

I work on cryptography and, more broadly, in theoretical computer science: using rigorous mathematical foundations, I develop new techniques to protect privacy and integrity of information. I also explore the connections between cryptography and areas such as complexity theory, information theory, and computer security at large.

In the past ten years, the Internet has evolved in terms of both the type of services and applications being deployed and the kind of malicious activity being carried out. Web applications have become tremendously popular, and, nowadays, they are routinely used in security-critical environments, such as medical, financial, and military systems.

Along with Professor H. Zheng, I co-lead the SAND Lab for research on Systems, Algorithms, Networking and Data.  In recent years, my research has taken a data-driven approach to understanding real networking and systems problems, and using data analysis and models to guide the development of solutions using algorithm and systems.