Distinguished Lecture: A Case for OneSwarm

Date: 
Tuesday, October 6, 2009 - 2:36pm

UCSB COMPUTER SCIENCE DEPARTMENT PRESENTS
DISTINGUISHED LECTURE:

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2009
10:00 AM Reception
10:30 AM – 11:30 AM
Engineering Sciences Building, Room 1001

HOST: Ben Zhao

SPEAKER: THOMAS ANDERSON
University of Washington
Title: A Case for OneSwarm
Abstract:

OneSwarm is a platform for wide-scale distributed peer-to-peer
applications, designed as an open-source alternative to cloud computing
for sharing user-generated content. While storing and sharing data
through centralized data centers offers many advantages to the system
designer, it is not without its drawbacks for the rest of us: a loss of
privacy, application lock-in, susceptibility to censorship,
applicability to the long tail of unprofitable user-generated content,
and in the limit a lack of system scalability and reliability.
Peer-to-peer systems to date suffer from many of these same issues,
leaving us without much of an alternative. OneSwarm is our attempt to
address these issues, starting with the fundamental assumption of no
centralized trust — OneSwarm is not only open source, it is designed to
resist being “owned”. This raises questions of incentives, user
interface design, storage, privacy, and application management, that
will be the focus of the talk.

Bio:

Thomas Anderson is the Robert E. Dinning Professor of Computer Science
and Engineering at the University of Washington. His research interests
span all aspects of building practical, robust, and efficient computer
systems, including distributed systems, operating systems, computer
networks, multiprocessors, and security. He is an ACM Fellow, winner of
the ACM SIGOPS Mark Weiser Award, winner of the IEEE Bennett Prize, and
he has co-authored over a dozen award papers.