Collect and Reflect

Date: 
Thursday, March 9, 2006 - 9:12am

Carol Strohecker
Strohecker and Associates
Date: Thursday, March 9, 2006
Time: 3:00pm-4:00pm
Location: Engineering I, Room 2114

Abstract:
About 20 years ago, silicon chips were becoming smaller and smaller and
cheaper and cheaper, making inevitable the revolution in computer and
communications technologies. Today sensing technologies are becoming
progressively smaller and cheaper. They are available as a new medium
for creative works, enabling experimentation with mobile sensing and
with representations of sensed data through visual, aural and
potentially haptic modes.

Accessibility of this information is pointing the way to radical
changes in health care, education and environmental awareness. I will
illustrate some of these potentials through describing an emerging
“collect and reflect” genre. Three example projects incorporate readily
available sensors and rely on situations of use to inform their
designs. Our discussion will focus on data visualizations and
interaction designs to facilitate constructive learning.

Biography:
Carol Strohecker is an internationally known scholar and generator of
tools and environments for learning. She is a Visiting Lecturer at the
Dun Laoghaire Institute of Art, Design and Technology and an advisor
for research programs of the European Commission. A former Fellow of
the National Endowment for the Arts and the Harvard University Graduate
School of Design, she has taught at Harvard, Media Lab Europe, Learning
Lab Denmark, and the Maryland Institute College of Art. Carol directed
the Everyday Learning research group at Media Lab Europe and was a
senior member of its Executive Team. She is a founding member of the
editorial board for the MIT Press journal, Presence, and regularly
contributes to research-related boards and program committees. She
earned her graduate degrees at the MIT Media Lab, completing the
doctorate in 1991. Her publications and further information are
available at www.carolstrohecker.info.

Host: Matthew Turk