Special Topic Courses (290) & Graduate Seminars (595)

290D - Social and Biological Networks

Quarter: 
Winter 2015
Instructor: 
Tobias Höllerer
Course area: 
Foundations/Theory
Location: 
Phelps 3526
Day and time: 
TR 9:30a-10:45a
Enrollment code: 
62042
Units: 
4

Description

This course will explore Network Science concepts in the context of social and biological networks. Topics covered include social structure theory, evolution of biological networks, management of Big Data, and visualization of networks.

290G - Research Topics in Cryptography

Quarter: 
Winter 2015
Instructor: 
Stefano Tessaro
Course area: 
Foundations/Theory
Location: 
Phelps 2510
Day and time: 
MW 11:00a-12:50p
Enrollment code: 
09621
Units: 
4

Description

This class will study current research topics in cryptography. In this edition, we will focus on the applied side of cryptography, i.e., we will look at the research surrounding cryptographic methods that are either currently in use, or that are candidates for future deployment. We will adopt a rigorous lens, learning to reason formally about security requirements, and whether these goals are achieved.

The following is a tentative list of topics that we will be covering: * Review of basic cryptographic algorithms and standards: Block ciphers, cryptographic hash functions, secret- and public-key encryption, digital signatures, message authentication. * Authenticated encryption * Public-key infrastructures and certificates * Introduction to the TLS/SSL protocol * Generation of pseudorandom bits * Storage encryption * Password-based cryptography * Application-specific encryption: Format-preserving encryption, format-transforming encryption, order-preserving encryption * The Bitcoin protocol

The class will alternate lectures on foundations with student presentations on concrete solutions and existing attacks. There will be a final project at the end of class. The class complements Huijia Lin’s graduate-level introduction to cryptography taking place in Fall ‘14, with only a small overlap. While students who attended it will see further applications of the principles they learnt, this class is meant to be independent -- the necessary background will be delivered as we proceed.

This class is suitable both for students with a theoretical background as well as for students with a systems mindset who are interested in learning about cryptography. Topics for presentations, as well as projects, will be available for students with both these inclinations.

 

290I - Mixed and Augmented Reality

Quarter: 
Winter 2015
Instructor: 
Tobias Höllerer
Course area: 
Applications
Location: 
Phelps 2510
Day and time: 
TR 11:00a-12:50p
Enrollment code: 
55178
Units: 
4

Description

Mixed and Augmented Reality, an active research field since the 1990s, has recently gained significant popularity because of the possibility of being implemented on smart phones. Many people see it as one of the most important computer interfaces in the future of computing. Augmented Reality is the concept of overlaying computer-generated information on top of the physical world. Mixed Reality is a bit broader and subsumes the fields of Augmented Reality, Augmented Virtuality, and Virtual Reality. This class provides a hands-on introduction to these novel interface technologies. Programming experience in C++ and some knowledge of OpenGL is required.

290I - Mobile Imaging

Quarter: 
Winter 2015
Instructor: 
Matthew Turk
Course area: 
Applications
Location: 
Phelps 2510
Day and time: 
TR 3:00p-4:50p
Enrollment code: 
09639
Units: 
4

Description

Mobile imaging is becoming increasingly important in computer- and communication-related fields. As the computational power and bandwidth of mobile devices increase, more and more use is being made of images, video, and 3D in a wide range of applications and environments. Mobile computing and imaging are central to communications, entertainment, human-computer interaction, medicine, meteorology, space exploration, etc. In this course, we will explore the digital imaging process, from light and image formation to image processing to display systems; the constraints and opportunities afforded by the mobile computing environment; and a range of applications and techniques relevant to state-of-the-art mobile imaging. Students will complete a group mobile imaging project and present related research to the class.

290I - Special Topics in Image Synthesis

Quarter: 
Winter 2015
Course area: 
Applications
Location: 
Building 387 Rm 104
Day and time: 
MW 10:00a-11:50a
Enrollment code: 
62828
Units: 
4

Description

Image synthesis is the process of generating an image from a scene
description and is one of the fundamental problems in computer graphics.
This course focuses on the theory of image synthesis as applied in modern
film studios today, and covers both high-end scanline rendering algorithms
as well as physically-based rendering systems such as ray tracing and
radiosity methods.

Topics include radiometry, the REYES algorithm and Renderman API,
stochastic ray tracing, the Rendering Equation, Monte Carlo integration,
variance reduction techniques, photon mapping, reflection models,
participating media, subsurface scattering, and advanced algorithms for
light transport.  For class assignments, students will have to program some
of the algorithms discussed in class to generate their own images.
Students are expected to be solid programmers in C/C++ to be successful
in the class.

290N - Information Retreival and Advanced Internet Services

Quarter: 
Winter 2015
Instructor: 
Tao Yang
Course area: 
Applications
Location: 
Phelps 2510
Day and time: 
MW 3:00p-4:50p
Enrollment code: 
09654
Units: 
4

Description

This course covers advanced topics on information retrieval, web search and mining, and related Internet services. The topics include search engines and advertisements, web crawling, classification, indexing and data serving, ranking and recommendation, user behavior analysis, and online services. This course will also cover system and middleware support for building related large-scale Internet services.

595G - Hacking Club

Quarter: 
Winter 2015
Location: 
Harold Frank Hall 1132
Day and time: 
W 6:00p-10:00p
Enrollment code: 
62836
Units: 
2

Description

This course focuses on practical applications of and issues in Computer Security. This includes the study of exploitation techniques, software defenses, and recent developments in the field. Students will be expected to invest time, outside of class, developing an understanding of Computer Security concepts. In particular, there will be one take-home challenge per week that will be mandatory for everyone to complete.

Support for this seminar provided by Appfolio.

595N - Faculty Research Seminar

Quarter: 
Winter 2015
Location: 
Harold Frank Hall 1132
Day and time: 
F 1:00p-2:00p
Enrollment code: 
62844
Units: 
2

Description

  • Required for all first year CS PhD students.
  • Does NOT satisfy the CS MS 595 requirement. 

290C - Logic, Computation, and Programming Languages

Quarter: 
Winter 2015
Course area: 
Theory
Location: 
Phelps 2510
Day and time: 
TR 1:00p-2:50p
Enrollment code: 
55160
Units: 
4

Description

This course will examine the close connection between formal logic, computation, and programming languages. The two primary areas of investigation will be (1) various systems of formal logic and their connection to different type systems via the Curry-Howard Correspondence; and (2) various fragments of first-order logic and their connection to logic programming languages. The class will involve both understanding the theory behind these connections and implementing these ideas in practice. A basic knowledge of first-order logic is assumed, but a deep background in logic is not required. The exact topics studied will be largely driven by student interest.

CS 595F Technology & Society Gateway Seminar

Quarter: 
Winter 2015
Location: 
SSMS 1310
Day and time: 
T 200-330
Enrollment code: 
70508
Units: 
4

Description

The Technology and Society gateway seminar is designed to introduce graduate students who are interested in the Technology and Society Ph.D. emphasis to an interdisciplinary area of research. The gateway is required for all Technology and Society Ph.D. emphasis students. Students who have already taken the gateway course but are interested in this topic are encouraged to take the course again. CITS affiliated faculty members are also invited to participate in the seminar. The course is graded P/NP with attendance, participation, and a class presentation during the quarter as the only requirements.

The Winter 2015 seminar will focus on the core of CITS: we will seek to understand the cultural transitions and social innovations associated with technology, from a global, pervasive perspective.  We will study the context of technology and its impacts in a variety of disciplines, including examining the diffusion and accessibility of information technology worldwide.  To do so, our seminars will alternate between presentations by faculty affiliated with CITS, who will speak about research topics relevant to the mission of CITS; and presentations by enrolled students.  Students are welcome to speak either about their own work, or about work by others on a relevant topic.  The course will provide opportunities to explore ICT in multiple contexts, potentially including the interaction of ICT and American politics; ICT and credibility and privacy; and ICT and the digital divide.

Through the seminar students will learn both the broad context in which CITS is positioned, and will gain understanding of the interdisciplinary approaches towards ICT-focused research undertaken by CITS faculty.

290A - Big Data and Networks

Quarter: 
Fall 2014
Instructor: 
Subhash Suri, Xifeng Yan
Course area: 
Theory
Location: 
HFH 1132
Day and time: 
Wed. 12:00 - 2:50pm
Enrollment code: 
59337
Units: 
4

Description

CS 290A is the first in a new group of courses we are introducing in the broad area of network science research.  This course will focus on fundamental theory and algorithms for working with Big Data and networks. Topics covered will include graph embedding, spanning trees, network flow, random graph models, network formation and evolution, structure and attribute-based search, clustering, partitioning, and distributed dynamical systems. 

290B - Scalable Internet Services

Quarter: 
Fall 2014
Course area: 
Applications
Location: 
Phelp 2510
Day and time: 
TR1:00-2:50
Enrollment code: 
09936
Units: 
4.0, letter grade ONLY

Description

This course explores advanced topics in highly scalable Internet services and the underlying systems architecture. Large scale web sites and software delivered as a service are becoming pervasive, and are running on millions of servers. Web 2.0 has redefined the web user experience and new infrastructure technologies have redefined what it takes to launch a state-of-the-art web site. Amazon's web services, such as Simple Storage Service (S3) and Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2), and Google's Compute Engine are changing the game for hosting scalable fault-tolerant sites. New programming frameworks, such as Ruby on Rails, are making the development of interesting sites easier. Yet some concerns just don't go away: caching, load balancing, fail-over, redundancy, back-end databases, security, and monitoring to name a few.

In this course students will use state-of-the-art web technologies and learn how to tackle the scalability and fault-tolerance concerns. This is a "learn by doing" course: course projects will form the primary focus of the course with the lectures and discussion of research papers providing background material. Projects will be conducted in teams, and students will build their own scalable, redundant web site on EC2 using these web technologies and the Ruby on Rails framework.

CS 290G - Foundation of Cryptography

Quarter: 
Fall 2014
Instructor: 
Huijia (Rachel) Lin
Course area: 
Foundations
Location: 
Phelp 2510
Day and time: 
TR 300-450
Enrollment code: 
50260
Units: 
4

Description

Cryptography provides important tools for ensuring the security of modern digital systems and the privacy of the sensitive information involved in them. Nowadays, core cryptographic tools, such as, encryption, digital signature, key agreement protocols, are used behind millions of daily online transactions. This course will give an introduction to the development and application of cryptographic tools.

We will focus on the foundation of cryptography. The first and foremost questions to ask are philosophical: "What does it mean that a cryptographic tool, say encryption, is secure?", "Is security possible?", "What makes cryptographic tools trustworthy?". Since the 70's, Modern cryptography developed the mathematical language to articulate these questions, as well as the formal method to answer them. Various cryptographic tools and systems are then developed using the mathematical language and their security guarantees are rigorously reasoned about using the formal method. In this class, we study the mathematical underpinning of cryptography and core cryptographic tools developed upon it.

595G - Hacking Club

Quarter: 
Fall 2014
Instructor: 
Richard A. Kemmerer
Location: 
HFH 1132
Day and time: 
Wednesdays 6:00pm-10:00pm
Enrollment code: 
69039
Units: 
2

Description

This course focuses on practical applications of and issues in Computer Security. This includes the study of exploitation techniques, software defenses, and recent developments in the field. Students will be expected to invest time, outside of class, developing an understanding of Computer Security concepts. In particular, there will be one take-home challenge per week that will be mandatory for everyone to complete.

Support for this seminar provided by AppFolio.

For help in enrolling in these courses, please contact the Undergraduate Advisor.

CS 595J - Seminar in Network Science

Quarter: 
Fall 2014
Instructor: 
Ambuj K. Singh
Location: 
Bldg 434, Rm 122
Day and time: 
Friday 1:00-2:00
Units: 
2

Description

A weekly seminar on Network Science, with broad topics rotating amongst these different focus areas:  socials sciences, algorithms, biological networks, dynamics and control, Cyberinfranstructure.   Seminars will also touch on topics relevant to ethics, careers in academia, research methods, presentation skills, and global awareness. 

CS 595J - Seminar on Secure Search

Quarter: 
Fall 2014
Course area: 
TBA
Location: 
HFH 1152
Day and time: 
Wednesday 2:30-4:00
Units: 
2

Description


This seminar will study recent papers on security issues and algorithms for information retrieval and search.
 

CS 595J Seminar on Large-Scale Information & Storage Systems

Quarter: 
Fall 2014
Course area: 
Systems
Location: 
HFH 1152
Day and time: 
Friday 1:00-2:30
Units: 
2

Description

This seminar will study recent papers on large-scale cloud/cluster-computing platforms and storage systems,  and system support for  mining and search.